Another Challenge Read Done! Loving Trollope….

BarchesterTBarchester Towers

Anthony Trollope

Barsetshire Chronicles, Book 2

Signet Classics.  1963.  535 pgs with afterword by Robert W. Daniel.

Originally published in three volumes in 1857.

Guardian 1000 challenge.  Comedy titles.

Other Trollope books I’ve read:  The Warden (blogged, 11/4/13) and The Way we Live Now (blogged, 10/12/13).

I know I’ve said this before but at the risk of being a little repetitive, I love, love, love this challenge for leading me to books and authors I would never have picked up — but ended up so happy with.

Regarding this particular title, I’m not alone.  Barsetshire Towers is considered one of Trollope’s most-loved, most accessible, books.  It is very funny.  For once I wished I was reading it on the Kindle so I could have marked out the laugh-out-loud passages; there were many!  The book is about power.  Whether it be between church colleagues (huge fighters, here!), husbands and wives, men and women, masters and servants — there is a constant struggle for who has the upper hand.  But Trollope keeps this theme light; no one is going to get deeply hurt here.

Mr_Slope

See more good Trollope goodies and info at this cool website: http://www.anthonytrollope.com/

This is the second book of Trollope’s six novel series, the Barsetshire Chronicles.  The first,  The Warden (1855),  introduced us to several key characters who I assume (and hope) will reappear in the rest of the series.  The Warden focused on Mr. Harding, a sweet and gentle churchman; his son-in-law, fire-breathing and hard-charging Archdeacon Grantly; his lovely but firm daughter, Eleanor, and a host of other characters.  Barchester Towers continues their story and adds in more drama represented by the arrival of a new bishop, Rev. Proudie.  Bishop Proudie’s entourage includes his obsequious and conniving chaplain, Mr. Slope and his strident, forceful and dictatorial wife, Mrs. Proudie (the real bishop!).  A power struggle ensues between the forces of Grantly (high-church) and Slope (low-church).  I confess that the intricacies of nineteenth-century English church politics escapes me, but there are enough references that I can discern the basic principles.  However, these concepts take second place to the human characters who struggle for the upper hand in such a spiritual, religious manner!  I thought a few times, hey, WWJD?

  • Pros:  lots of social satire, wonderful characterizations.  I also love, love Trollope’s use of last names as a clue to the characters:  domineering Mrs. Proudie, slimy Slope, social ladder-climbing Mrs. Lookaloft, and the Quiverful family (fourteen kids!) and many others.
  • Cons:  well, wordy.  Even my Trollope-love gets worn down by the many side-plots and asides.  Trollope likes to appeal to the reader in a blatant way which sometimes grated on my nerves when it didn’t advance the story.

Only one more Trollope on the Challenge list:  book six of the Barsetshire Series.  Now, this will represent a challenge to my OCD tendency to strictly read books series in order….should I read the intervening three books to get at the last one?  I think I’ll spend some more time at:  Anthony Trollope.com to get a feel for the intervening books.  Maybe I’ll reward myself by checking out the BBC’s lovely miniseries based on the first two books, as well!  Stay tuned!

 

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